Turtles and Oil Spills Workshops Held

Experts united at Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, Texas to talk about sea turtles and oil spills. Check this link for a local news report on the event, led by oil spill science specialist Chris Hale.

Source: Turtles and Oil Spills Workshops Held

New oil spill science workshop announced!

Save the date for Sea turtles & oil spills, Thursday, March 23rd, 2017 at Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, Texas. It will explore how sea turtles fared during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and discuss ongoing conservation and restoration efforts. Not near Texas? Never fear! This workshop is also available as a webinar the day of the event. Click here for more information.

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Researchers offer bounty for live tiger shrimp

Check out this story about a Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant project that is studying invasive Asian tiger shrimp.

Study investigates how tiger shrimp may affect native Gulf shrimp

When a new species appears in the Gulf of Mexico, it can cause concern and raise a lot of questions. Which habitat does it prefer? What will it eat? What will eat it?

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One of these species of concern is the invasive tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon), a very large shrimp that is native to Indo-Pacific, Asian and Australian waters. Jennifer Hill, an assistant professor at Louisiana Tech University, has been working to determine which type of habitat tiger shrimp prefer in the Gulf and how they might affect native shrimp populations. She is studying whether tiger shrimp will compete with native populations for food, if native shrimp are likely to become their prey and if existing Gulf predators will eat tiger shrimp. Read more

Submit an abstract for Bays and Bayous

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The deadline for submitting abstracts has been extended to 5 P.M. Central Time on Friday, Sept. 16. View the call for abstracts.

The 2016 Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Bays and Bayous Symposium’s program committee welcomes and encourages the participation of scientists, natural resource professionals, students, business people, educators, outreach specialists, policy and decision makers, consultants and individuals from governmental or non-governmental organizations to submit a presentation abstract.

Presenters are encouraged to discuss current research results that are relevant to Gulf of Mexico environmental issues and how this research is used to support the economy, the environment and society by informing the decision-making process or increasing marine science literacy.

Session topics include:

  • Climate and hazard resilience
  • Oil spill impacts
  • Habitat management and restoration
  • Living resources
  • Water quality and quantity

Abstracts can be submitted for both oral and poster presentations. The oral presentations will be 15 minutes with a 5-minute question-and-answer session following each presentation. Individuals wishing to present must submit an abstract no later than 5 p.m., Friday, Sept. 16, 2016. Abstracts will be limited to 250 words.

Join Oil Spill Resilience Seminar on September 27 In-person or Online

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What traits made communities more resilient after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill? What programs and resources are available to communities? What lessons can be learned to overcome disasters and strengthen resiliency? Photo courtesy of Mississippi Alabama Sea Grant Consortium.

Building resilient communities: Lessons learned from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

The Sea Grant Oil Spill Outreach Team will host a seminar on community resiliency following environmental disasters on September 27, 2016 in Long Beach, MS. To register to join the seminar in person or online, click here.

 

Register now to become a Coastal Mississippi Master Naturalist

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Keep your eyes open for tagged crabs

Scientists at Nicholls State University in Louisiana are asking crabbers, shrimpers, fishers and the general public to report any tagged blue crab they catch. The project includes tagging in various areas of the Gulf, and the researchers are studying regional-scale movements of the blue crab. They have a special interest in females once they leave the estuaries and enter the Gulf. Each reported tag carries a reward of $5-$50.

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