Oil Spill Outreach Team gets three more years of funding

Great news, friends — the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) has agreed to continue funding our Oil Spill Science Outreach Team for three more years! Read all about it in a staff blog by Larissa Graham, part of the outreach team.

Oil spill outreach team photo

Red snapper funding opportunity announced

A lucky anglers hauls in a red snapper from the Gulf of Mexico.

Florida Sea Grant agent Betty Staugler readies a red snapper for return to its depth using a spring-loaded descending device. (Florida Sea Grant photo)

The Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, on behalf of the Sea Grant college programs in the Gulf of Mexico region and NOAA Fisheries, is accepting proposals to develop an experimental design(s) that will be incorporated into larger advanced technology and mark-recapture requests for proposals planned for Fiscal Year 2017.

The deadline for letters of intent for the design phase of this research effort is 5 p.m. Central Time on Friday, June 3, 2016.

The design will be used to assess the population of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) on artificial reefs and other structures, and as the basis for a Gulf-wide estimate (with estimates also produced for natural habitats) of absolute abundance.

The red snapper is a popular target of anglers and the commercial fishing industry throughout the Gulf of Mexico. Historical overharvesting resulted in a depleted population, but under current management measures the population is recovering, with full recovery expected by 2032.

Some controversy surrounds the current stock assessment for red snapper, particularly with regard to accuracy of population estimates on artificial reefs and other structures considered to be difficult to sample using trawl surveys.

For detailed information, go to http://masgc.org/funding/red-snapper

Ready to move your community toward resilience? Join us.

Are you experiencing saltwater intrusion to your aging infrastructure?

Do you have low-lying roads that are susceptible to flooding? Finding it problematic to secure funding for projects to mitigate for hazardous events? Is it difficult to communicate the risks associated with some of these impacts?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then you are not alone. A recent survey revealed that coastal flooding, saltwater intrusion and risk communication are still among the most challenging issues communities in our area are facing.

So what can communities do to “move the needle” on these complex issues? Well, one way is to learn from each other. On April 19-21, 2016, the Gulf of Mexico Climate Outreach Community of Practice will be hosting its 7th Annual Meeting in Biloxi, Miss.

This year, participants will work together on the above issues in small groups to develop creative solutions and plans for taking action in their local communities. Teams of experts in science, adaptation, extension, and communication will be ready to “roll up their sleeves” and get to work brainstorming what resources can be brought to the table, what tools can be used to visualize options, and what costs are associated with various adaptation actions.

New at this year’s meeting will be a poster session and awards program that will offer an opportunity for participants to showcase best practices and current research for topics, such as climate resilient communities, clean energy future and impacts of sea level rise on coastal and estuarine systems.

Participants will go on a field trip and learn how the City of Biloxi is tackling climate issues with new ordinances, high water mark initiatives and a commitment to the Community Rating System. Of course you don’t want to miss the Spirit of Community Awards, which recognize excellence in the field of climate communication and adaptation. To top it all off, a down-home fish fry will give participants an opportunity to network while enjoying the sights and sounds of Old Biloxi.

Why attend a gathering of this kind? Because you can make the difference in moving the needle toward a more resilient future. This year, decide to take action, commit to pushing yourself out of your comfort zone and make plans to join us for an experience that will be well worth your time and energy. Registration will open in early February.

Learn more about the meeting here.

Innovative national conference to explore how communities solve waterfront challenges

photo of sailboats in biscayne bay

Situated on Biscayne Bay, the city of Miami experiences many of the issues that waterfront communities face each day. (Florida Sea Grant photo)

As urban, commercial, and rural waterfronts across the U.S. face challenges to their continued existence and development, community leaders are increasingly finding solutions by listening, learning and interacting with each other.

That’s the impetus behind the National Working Waterfronts and Waterways Symposium, which runs this year from Nov.16-19 in Tampa, Fla.

It’s the only conference of its kind to bring together planners, property developers, researchers, elected officials, attorneys, and other stakeholders from waterfront communities to learn about local, state and national initiatives, management approaches and tools to address issues of water access and water-dependent industries.

Attendees will hear about new approaches that increase the capacity of coastal communities to balance competing uses and plan for the future of working waterfronts and waterways, according to conference organizer Bob Swett, a specialist in boating issues and waterways planning for Florida Sea Grant.

“They are dedicated champions of local working waterfronts, and they come from throughout the U.S. to share ideas and solutions, and to learn about new approaches,” he said. “Being in the company of hundreds of such like-minded souls can be quite transformative.”

This year’s conference includes sessions on redevelopment of waterfront communities, marine industry sustainability, surviving commercial fishing declines, land-use issues related to waterway management, and preserving maritime culture and heritage.

Registration for the symposium is $425 until Oct. 19. For commercials entities and organizations wishing to engage with attendees, sponsorships that include display space are available through a range of packages on a first-come, first-served basis.

Complete symposium details are available at the conference website, http://www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu/NWWWS/index.html.

New publications and science seminar focus on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill’s impact on fisheries

The Sea Grant Oil Spill Science Outreach Team is excited to released its first oil spill science outreach publications.

Oil spill sceince - seafood cover
The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill’s Impact on Gulf Seafood

Learn about the results of federal, state and independent seafood testing after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Oil spill sceince - landings cover
Fisheries Landings and Disasters in the Gulf of Mexico

Learn about historical fisheries landings data within the context of man-made and natural disasters. Explore why this data is important for fisheries management.

 

The Oil Spill Outreach Team will also be offering a seminar on seafood safety:

Oil Spill Science Seminar: Healthy Gulf Seafood – Nov 18, 2015 in Long Beach, MS – Learn how agencies tested seafood during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, how fish and other animals break down oil and other contaminants, and how scientists monitoring seafood to keep consumers safe. This seminar is free and open to all.

The next series of outreach publications will focus on dispersants. Click here to view upcoming science seminars that the oil spill science outreach team is offering around the Gulf. To be updated about the oil spill science outreach team activities, seminars, and publications sign up for their email list (click here).

Online viewer shows values for habitats in Gulf

GecoView

 

The Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Services Viewer shows, in an interactive format, the values people place on salt marshes, mangroves and oyster reefs in the Gulf of Mexico. Based on research results, this tool fills an informational gap in the Gulf.

Read more

Use viewer

 

Oil Spill Science Seminar: Bridging the Gap

Bridging the Gap Between Oil Spill Researchers and Responders Workshop

April 14th, 2015 – Port Aransas, TX
Click here for the flyer

The Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant Oil Spill Outreach Team and Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve will be hosting the Bridging the Gap Between Oil Spill Researchers and Responders Workshop on Tuesday, April 14th, 2015 from 9am-3pm at the Estuarine Research Center on the campus of the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, TX.

The primary purpose of this workshop is to share oil spill science and increase communication between researchers, natural resource managers, and emergency responders.This workshop is offered at no cost and lunch will be provided. For more information, please see the attached flyer.

To register, either click the link on the flyer or visit http://goo.gl/48PQUT. Registration is limited and closes on Monday, April 6th, so please be sure to register soon. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Monica Wilson at 727-553-3516 or Colbi Gemmell at 361-749-3156.

Webinar announcement: Climate change, community resilience and restoration in the Gulf of Mexico

climate and restoration webinar graphic announcement

Many restoration planning documents and programs in the Gulf of Mexico highlight the need to address climate change impacts as part of the restoration framework. While precedent exists on how to integrate climate change into restoration decision-making, many post-Deepwater Horizon restoration projects fail to adequately address climate change impacts.

At the same time, coastal communities in the Gulf of Mexico region are both on the front line of climate impacts, as well as the ones hit hardest by the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster.

This webinar will bring together a panel of experts to discuss the complex intersection of climate change, community resilience and Gulf of Mexico restoration, focusing on the challenges of and opportunities for creating restoration projects that both incorporate climate change considerations and are responsive to the needs of coastal communities.

The webinar will take place from 1-3 p.m. (Central Time), on Friday, April 10.

Webinar details – View speaker list and topics.

Register for free webinar – Register to join the webinar.