Walton joins Sea Grant as oyster aquaculture extension specialist

walton bio pic 1(OCEAN SPRINGS, Miss.) — The Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium (MASGC) welcomes Bill Walton of Auburn University to its outreach team. He is serving as an oyster aquaculture extension specialist who will use aquaculture as a tool for restoration, stock assessment and farming to help increase oyster production in Mississippi.

Walton, who has a doctorate degree in fisheries science, is also an associate professor at Auburn University, an extension specialist with the Alabama Cooperative Extension System and a faculty member at Dauphin Island Sea Lab.

A partnership between the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources (DMR), The University of Southern Mississippi, Auburn University, the Alabama Cooperative Extension System and MASGC made the position possible. Read More

MASGC seeks fiscal officer

The Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium (MASGC) is searching for a fiscal officer to help support its university-based coastal science program.

Candidates must be able to formulate and manage budgets; process, produce and organize financial information; balance and reconcile accounts; and develop proposals. They should have extensive experience in accounting, finance and grants.gov.

The position is a full-time position with benefits through The University of Southern Mississippi and will be located at USM’s Gulf Coast Research Lab in Ocean Springs, Mississippi.

Minimum requirements include a bachelor’s degree and three years in business and fiscal management. A master’s degree is preferred.

Candidates must apply online (http://usm.edu/employment-hr, posting number 0004046) through USM.

The Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium is a program that supports marine research, extension, outreach and education programs. MASGC is one of 33 Sea Grant College Programs located around the United States.

Oil Spill Outreach Team gets three more years of funding

Great news, friends — the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) has agreed to continue funding our Oil Spill Science Outreach Team for three more years! Read all about it in a staff blog by Larissa Graham, part of the outreach team.

Oil spill outreach team photo

Keep your eyes open for tagged crabs

Scientists at Nicholls State University in Louisiana are asking crabbers, shrimpers, fishers and the general public to report any tagged blue crab they catch. The project includes tagging in various areas of the Gulf, and the researchers are studying regional-scale movements of the blue crab. They have a special interest in females once they leave the estuaries and enter the Gulf. Each reported tag carries a reward of $5-$50.

tagging_flyer_GoM

50 Years of Sea Grant: Science Serving America’s Coasts

Here’s a look at the diverse work Sea Grant programs across the country have been doing over the last 50 years.

Gulf of Mexico Alliance receives NOAA Coastal Resilience Award

The Gulf of Mexico Alliance (Alliance) received a major NOAA Coastal Resilience Grant today. Two of the six Alliance teams, Habitat Resources and Coastal Resilience, will work with 10 coastal communities to foster resilience planning and promote best practices for future mitigation actions.

Tracie Sempier (of Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance) and LaDon Swann (of Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant) are two of the project leaders who wrote the proposal that was selected for funding.

Read more about the project.

Ready to move your community toward resilience? Join us.

Are you experiencing saltwater intrusion to your aging infrastructure?

Do you have low-lying roads that are susceptible to flooding? Finding it problematic to secure funding for projects to mitigate for hazardous events? Is it difficult to communicate the risks associated with some of these impacts?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then you are not alone. A recent survey revealed that coastal flooding, saltwater intrusion and risk communication are still among the most challenging issues communities in our area are facing.

So what can communities do to “move the needle” on these complex issues? Well, one way is to learn from each other. On April 19-21, 2016, the Gulf of Mexico Climate Outreach Community of Practice will be hosting its 7th Annual Meeting in Biloxi, Miss.

This year, participants will work together on the above issues in small groups to develop creative solutions and plans for taking action in their local communities. Teams of experts in science, adaptation, extension, and communication will be ready to “roll up their sleeves” and get to work brainstorming what resources can be brought to the table, what tools can be used to visualize options, and what costs are associated with various adaptation actions.

New at this year’s meeting will be a poster session and awards program that will offer an opportunity for participants to showcase best practices and current research for topics, such as climate resilient communities, clean energy future and impacts of sea level rise on coastal and estuarine systems.

Participants will go on a field trip and learn how the City of Biloxi is tackling climate issues with new ordinances, high water mark initiatives and a commitment to the Community Rating System. Of course you don’t want to miss the Spirit of Community Awards, which recognize excellence in the field of climate communication and adaptation. To top it all off, a down-home fish fry will give participants an opportunity to network while enjoying the sights and sounds of Old Biloxi.

Why attend a gathering of this kind? Because you can make the difference in moving the needle toward a more resilient future. This year, decide to take action, commit to pushing yourself out of your comfort zone and make plans to join us for an experience that will be well worth your time and energy. Registration will open in early February.

Learn more about the meeting here.

Nov. 18 oil spill science seminar to discuss Gulf seafood

The Sea Grant college programs in the Gulf of Mexico will host an oil spill science seminar, “Healthy Gulf Seafood,” from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 18, in the Hardy Hall Ballroom at The University of Southern Mississippi Gulf Park Campus, 730 E. Beach Blvd., in Long Beach, Miss.

shrimp web

The seminar will focus on how agencies tested seafood during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and what they found. Speakers also will talk about ways that fish and other animals break down contaminants, like oil, and how scientists monitor seafood to keep consumers safe.

There is no registration fee, and lunch will be provided. Registration is required to receive lunch. You can register online  or call Larissa Graham, Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant oil spill extension specialist, at 251-348-5436.

The seminar will also be available online as a webinar.

The Oil Spill Science Outreach Program is a partnership between the Sea Grant programs in the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI). The Gulf of Mexico Alliance manages and administers funding for GoMRI. The purpose of the outreach program is to share oil spill science with people whose livelihoods depend on a healthy Gulf.