Oil Spill Science Seminar: Bridging the Gap

Bridging the Gap Between Oil Spill Researchers and Responders Workshop

April 14th, 2015 – Port Aransas, TX
Click here for the flyer

The Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant Oil Spill Outreach Team and Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve will be hosting the Bridging the Gap Between Oil Spill Researchers and Responders Workshop on Tuesday, April 14th, 2015 from 9am-3pm at the Estuarine Research Center on the campus of the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, TX.

The primary purpose of this workshop is to share oil spill science and increase communication between researchers, natural resource managers, and emergency responders.This workshop is offered at no cost and lunch will be provided. For more information, please see the attached flyer.

To register, either click the link on the flyer or visit http://goo.gl/48PQUT. Registration is limited and closes on Monday, April 6th, so please be sure to register soon. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Monica Wilson at 727-553-3516 or Colbi Gemmell at 361-749-3156.

Webinar announcement: Climate change, community resilience and restoration in the Gulf of Mexico

climate and restoration webinar graphic announcement

Many restoration planning documents and programs in the Gulf of Mexico highlight the need to address climate change impacts as part of the restoration framework. While precedent exists on how to integrate climate change into restoration decision-making, many post-Deepwater Horizon restoration projects fail to adequately address climate change impacts.

At the same time, coastal communities in the Gulf of Mexico region are both on the front line of climate impacts, as well as the ones hit hardest by the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster.

This webinar will bring together a panel of experts to discuss the complex intersection of climate change, community resilience and Gulf of Mexico restoration, focusing on the challenges of and opportunities for creating restoration projects that both incorporate climate change considerations and are responsive to the needs of coastal communities.

The webinar will take place from 1-3 p.m. (Central Time), on Friday, April 10.

Webinar details – View speaker list and topics.

Register for free webinar – Register to join the webinar.

Oil Spill Science Seminar: Five years later, what have we learned?

On March 18, 2015, the Oil Spill Science Outreach Team will be holding a fisheries seminar, “Oil Spill Science Seminar: Five years later, what have we learned?” This seminar is free and open to the public. Scientists will present the latest fisheries-related research about the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and dispersant application on Gulf of Mexico habitats, communities, and individual species. For more information, please click here or email Larissa Graham with Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant. Mar 2015 FIsheries Science Seminar

Scientists use water-movement model, oyster larvae to search for suitable habitat

When oysters hatch, the microscopic larvae are totally at the mercy of the environment. Controlled by time and tide, they move where and when the water takes them, sometimes landing far from where they were spawned. When they finally come to rest, the place where they settle may or may not be a suitable place for them to grow.

Dr. Ruth Carmichael points out some man-made reefs designed to curb erosional processes visible near shore.

Dr. Ruth Carmichael points out some man-made reefs designed to curb erosional processes visible near shore.

Two researchers, marine ecologist Ruth H. Carmichael of the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and coastal physical oceanographer Keyong Park of Texas A&M University in Galveston, have combined their expertise to discover more about how these processes affect the larvae of oysters and other commercially important seafood populations as they make their first journeys. Read more